qudt:Quantity

URI: http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Quantity

Type
Description

A quantity is the measurement of an observable property of a particular object, event, or physical system. A quantity is always associated with the context of measurement (i.e. the thing measured, the measured value, the accuracy of measurement, etc.) whereas the underlying quantity kind is independent of any particular measurement. Thus, length is a quantity kind while the height of a rocket is a specific quantity of length; its magnitude that may be expressed in meters, feet, inches, etc. Examples of physical quantities include physical constants, such as the speed of light in a vacuum, Planck's constant, the electric permittivity of free space, and the fine structure constant.

In other words, quantities are quantifiable aspects of the world, such as the duration of a movie, the distance between two points, velocity of a car, the pressure of the atmosphere, and a person's weight; and units are used to describe their numerical measure.

Many quantity kinds are related to each other by various physical laws, and as a result, the associated units of some quantity kinds can be expressed as products (or ratios) of powers of other quantity kinds (e.g., momentum is mass times velocity and velocity is defined as distance divided by time). In this way, some quantities can be calculated from other measured quantities using their associations to the quantity kinds in these expressions. These quantity kind relationships are also discussed in dimensional analysis. Those that cannot be so expressed can be regarded as "fundamental" in this sense.

A quantity is distinguished from a "quantity kind" in that the former carries a value and the latter is a type specifier.

Properties
rdfs:subClassOf
`has quantity kind` min 0
`has quantity kind` only `Quantity Kind`
`is Delta Quantity` only `boolean  [xsd:boolean]`
`quantity value` only `Quantity value`
Annotations
rdfs:comment

A quantity is the measurement of an observable property of a particular object, event, or physical system. A quantity is always associated with the context of measurement (i.e. the thing measured, the measured value, the accuracy of measurement, etc.) whereas the underlying quantity kind is independent of any particular measurement. Thus, length is a quantity kind while the height of a rocket is a specific quantity of length; its magnitude that may be expressed in meters, feet, inches, etc. Examples of physical quantities include physical constants, such as the speed of light in a vacuum, Planck's constant, the electric permittivity of free space, and the fine structure constant.

In other words, quantities are quantifiable aspects of the world, such as the duration of a movie, the distance between two points, velocity of a car, the pressure of the atmosphere, and a person's weight; and units are used to describe their numerical measure.

Many quantity kinds are related to each other by various physical laws, and as a result, the associated units of some quantity kinds can be expressed as products (or ratios) of powers of other quantity kinds (e.g., momentum is mass times velocity and velocity is defined as distance divided by time). In this way, some quantities can be calculated from other measured quantities using their associations to the quantity kinds in these expressions. These quantity kind relationships are also discussed in dimensional analysis. Those that cannot be so expressed can be regarded as "fundamental" in this sense.

A quantity is distinguished from a "quantity kind" in that the former carries a value and the latter is a type specifier.

rdfs:label
Quantity
View as:  CSV

Work in progress

RDF/XML
<rdf:RDF
    xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
    xmlns:j.0="http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/"
    xmlns:owl="http://www.w3.org/2002/07/owl#"
    xmlns:rdfs="http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#"
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#" > 
  <rdf:Description rdf:about="http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Quantity">
    <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:nodeID="A0"/>
    <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:resource="http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Concept"/>
    <j.0:dbpediaMatch rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#anyURI">http://dbpedia.org/resource/Quantity</j.0:dbpediaMatch>
    <rdfs:comment rdf:datatype="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#HTML">&lt;p class="lm-para"&gt;A &lt;b&gt;quantity&lt;/b&gt; is the measurement of an observable property of a particular object, event, or physical system. A quantity is always associated with the context of measurement (i.e. the thing measured, the measured value, the accuracy of measurement, etc.) whereas the underlying &lt;b&gt;quantity kind&lt;/b&gt; is independent of any particular measurement. Thus, length is a quantity kind while the height of a rocket is a specific quantity of length; its magnitude that may be expressed in meters, feet, inches, etc. Examples of physical quantities include physical constants, such as the speed of light in a vacuum, Planck's constant, the electric permittivity of free space, and the fine structure constant. &lt;/p&gt;

&lt;p class="lm-para"&gt;In other words, quantities are quantifiable aspects of the world, such as the duration of a movie, the distance between two points, velocity of a car, the pressure of the atmosphere, and a person's weight; and units are used to describe their numerical measure. 

&lt;p class="lm-para"&gt;Many &lt;b&gt;quantity kinds&lt;/b&gt; are related to each other by various physical laws, and as a result, the associated units of some quantity kinds can be expressed as products (or ratios) of powers of other quantity kinds (e.g., momentum is mass times velocity and velocity is defined as distance divided by time). In this way, some quantities can be calculated from other measured quantities using their associations to the quantity kinds in these expressions. These quantity kind relationships are also discussed in dimensional analysis. Those that cannot be so expressed can be regarded as "fundamental" in this sense.&lt;/p&gt;
&lt;p class="lm-para"&gt;A quantity is distinguished from a "quantity kind" in that the former carries a value and the latter is a type specifier.&lt;/p&gt;</rdfs:comment>
    <rdfs:label>Quantity</rdfs:label>
    <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:nodeID="A1"/>
    <rdf:type rdf:resource="http://www.w3.org/2002/07/owl#Class"/>
    <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:resource="http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Quantifiable"/>
    <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:nodeID="A2"/>
    <rdfs:subClassOf rdf:nodeID="A3"/>
    <rdfs:isDefinedBy rdf:resource="http://qudt.org/2.1/schema/qudt"/>
  </rdf:Description>
</rdf:RDF>
TURTLE
@prefix owl: <http://www.w3.org/2002/07/owl#> .
@prefix rdf: <http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#> .
@prefix rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#> .
@prefix xsd: <http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#> .

<http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Quantity>
  rdf:type owl:Class ;
  <http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/dbpediaMatch> "http://dbpedia.org/resource/Quantity"^^xsd:anyURI ;
  rdfs:comment """<p class=\"lm-para\">A <b>quantity</b> is the measurement of an observable property of a particular object, event, or physical system. A quantity is always associated with the context of measurement (i.e. the thing measured, the measured value, the accuracy of measurement, etc.) whereas the underlying <b>quantity kind</b> is independent of any particular measurement. Thus, length is a quantity kind while the height of a rocket is a specific quantity of length; its magnitude that may be expressed in meters, feet, inches, etc. Examples of physical quantities include physical constants, such as the speed of light in a vacuum, Planck's constant, the electric permittivity of free space, and the fine structure constant. </p>

<p class=\"lm-para\">In other words, quantities are quantifiable aspects of the world, such as the duration of a movie, the distance between two points, velocity of a car, the pressure of the atmosphere, and a person's weight; and units are used to describe their numerical measure. 

<p class=\"lm-para\">Many <b>quantity kinds</b> are related to each other by various physical laws, and as a result, the associated units of some quantity kinds can be expressed as products (or ratios) of powers of other quantity kinds (e.g., momentum is mass times velocity and velocity is defined as distance divided by time). In this way, some quantities can be calculated from other measured quantities using their associations to the quantity kinds in these expressions. These quantity kind relationships are also discussed in dimensional analysis. Those that cannot be so expressed can be regarded as \"fundamental\" in this sense.</p>
<p class=\"lm-para\">A quantity is distinguished from a \"quantity kind\" in that the former carries a value and the latter is a type specifier.</p>"""^^rdf:HTML ;
  rdfs:isDefinedBy <http://qudt.org/2.1/schema/qudt> ;
  rdfs:label "Quantity" ;
  rdfs:subClassOf <http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Concept> ;
  rdfs:subClassOf <http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Quantifiable> ;
  rdfs:subClassOf [] ;
  rdfs:subClassOf [] ;
  rdfs:subClassOf [] ;
  rdfs:subClassOf [] ;
.
JSON
{"resource":"Quantity" 
 ,"qname":"qudt:Quantity" 
 ,"uri":"http:\/\/qudt.org\/schema\/qudt\/Quantity" 
 ,"properties":["comment":"&lt;p class=\"lm-para\"&gt;A &lt;b&gt;quantity&lt;\/b&gt; is the measurement of an observable property of a particular object, event, or physical system. A quantity is always associated with the context of measurement (i.e. the thing measured, the measured value, the accuracy of measurement, etc.) whereas the underlying &lt;b&gt;quantity kind&lt;\/b&gt; is independent of any particular measurement. Thus, length is a quantity kind while the height of a rocket is a specific quantity of length; its magnitude that may be expressed in meters, feet, inches, etc. Examples of physical quantities include physical constants, such as the speed of light in a vacuum, Planck's constant, the electric permittivity of free space, and the fine structure constant. &lt;\/p&gt;\n\n&lt;p class=\"lm-para\"&gt;In other words, quantities are quantifiable aspects of the world, such as the duration of a movie, the distance between two points, velocity of a car, the pressure of the atmosphere, and a person's weight; and units are used to describe their numerical measure. \n\n&lt;p class=\"lm-para\"&gt;Many &lt;b&gt;quantity kinds&lt;\/b&gt; are related to each other by various physical laws, and as a result, the associated units of some quantity kinds can be expressed as products (or ratios) of powers of other quantity kinds (e.g., momentum is mass times velocity and velocity is defined as distance divided by time). In this way, some quantities can be calculated from other measured quantities using their associations to the quantity kinds in these expressions. These quantity kind relationships are also discussed in dimensional analysis. Those that cannot be so expressed can be regarded as \"fundamental\" in this sense.&lt;\/p&gt;\n&lt;p class=\"lm-para\"&gt;A quantity is distinguished from a \"quantity kind\" in that the former carries a value and the latter is a type specifier.&lt;\/p&gt;" 
    ,"dbpedia match":"http:\/\/dbpedia.org\/resource\/Quantity" 
    ,"isDefinedBy":"&lt;http:\/\/qudt.org\/2.1\/schema\/qudt&gt;" 
    ,"label":"Quantity" 
    ,"subClassOf":null 
    ,"subClassOf":null 
    ,"subClassOf":null 
    ,"subClassOf":null 
    ,"subClassOf":"qudt:Concept" 
    ,"subClassOf":"qudt:Quantifiable" 
    ,"type":"owl:Class" 
    ]}
JSON-LD
{
  "@id" : "http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Quantity",
  "@type" : "owl:Class",
  "dbpediaMatch" : "http://dbpedia.org/resource/Quantity",
  "comment" : "<p class=\"lm-para\">A <b>quantity</b> is the measurement of an observable property of a particular object, event, or physical system. A quantity is always associated with the context of measurement (i.e. the thing measured, the measured value, the accuracy of measurement, etc.) whereas the underlying <b>quantity kind</b> is independent of any particular measurement. Thus, length is a quantity kind while the height of a rocket is a specific quantity of length; its magnitude that may be expressed in meters, feet, inches, etc. Examples of physical quantities include physical constants, such as the speed of light in a vacuum, Planck's constant, the electric permittivity of free space, and the fine structure constant. </p>\n\n<p class=\"lm-para\">In other words, quantities are quantifiable aspects of the world, such as the duration of a movie, the distance between two points, velocity of a car, the pressure of the atmosphere, and a person's weight; and units are used to describe their numerical measure. \n\n<p class=\"lm-para\">Many <b>quantity kinds</b> are related to each other by various physical laws, and as a result, the associated units of some quantity kinds can be expressed as products (or ratios) of powers of other quantity kinds (e.g., momentum is mass times velocity and velocity is defined as distance divided by time). In this way, some quantities can be calculated from other measured quantities using their associations to the quantity kinds in these expressions. These quantity kind relationships are also discussed in dimensional analysis. Those that cannot be so expressed can be regarded as \"fundamental\" in this sense.</p>\n<p class=\"lm-para\">A quantity is distinguished from a \"quantity kind\" in that the former carries a value and the latter is a type specifier.</p>",
  "isDefinedBy" : "http://qudt.org/2.1/schema/qudt",
  "label" : "Quantity",
  "subClassOf" : [ "_:b0", "http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Concept", "_:b1", "http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/Quantifiable", "_:b2", "_:b3" ],
  "@context" : {
    "subClassOf" : {
      "@id" : "http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#subClassOf",
      "@type" : "@id"
    },
    "dbpediaMatch" : {
      "@id" : "http://qudt.org/schema/qudt/dbpediaMatch",
      "@type" : "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#anyURI"
    },
    "comment" : {
      "@id" : "http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#comment",
      "@type" : "http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#HTML"
    },
    "label" : {
      "@id" : "http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#label"
    },
    "isDefinedBy" : {
      "@id" : "http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#isDefinedBy",
      "@type" : "@id"
    },
    "rdf" : "http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#",
    "owl" : "http://www.w3.org/2002/07/owl#",
    "xsd" : "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#",
    "rdfs" : "http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#"
  }
}

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